Need Help Sorting out Your Life? Need sage, sarcastic and slightly salacious suggestions? 

YouTubers are the new crossover stars, exporting their short form digital wit and wisdom to the analog world of the book. 

It’s a publishers dream. Millions of adoring teens – credit cards in hand - are following their favourite digital stars into bookstores and buying the Life Lessons and Self Help tips on offer.

For YouTubers, books offer legitimacy and the trappings of conventional respect that YouTube can’t quite offer and Hollywood isn’t – currently - willing to give. Move over Hunger Games & Divergent – here come the stars!


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

YOUTUBER BOOK REVIEWS : THE AUDIENCE WEIGHS IN!

ZOE SUGG: GIRL ONLINE

(oops: ghostwritten by Siobhan Curham – that got messy!!)

From the Critics:

“It is all so innocent, but Sugg has tapped into a truth: navigating those teenage years can be hellish, and for every moment spent wishing you could become an adult there is another spent secretly yearning to stay a child, when a hug from dad and a mug of hot chocolate could make everything seem all right again. The charm of Girl Online is the message that growing up doesn’t have to mean leaving childish stuff behind.”

- Anita Singh

Goodreads:

“I love this book because it incorporates really important things that young teens (and anyone really) can relate to, such as anxiety, cyber bullying, travel, homosexuality, family issues, friendship, death etc. The list is endless! I think this is what made me love this book so much, because it wasn’t just a pointless, fluffy read. It actually had substance that could really help young teens if they read it.

- Joel

“As I said, this book received 1 star. The inserted blog posts from 'Girl Online' were mediocre, the plot was average and predictable. What I thought would be delivered was not. This was generally a 'young adult' novel that only stood out because of the author, not because of the content (and even then, she didn't write it all herself.)”

- Maddie

ALFIE DEYES: THE POINTLESS BOOK

“I love that I can interact with Alfie and now be part of his challenges. I love the free app, too! Such a cool idea, the book is a great way to bring fans closer together”.

- Ellie Richards

Amazon review, titled ‘Disgusting example of status abuse‘, says: “[The Pointless Book] is a ripoff of Wreck This Journal and bribing viewers with DM’s so his book gets high ratings because he knows his fans are hungy for attention?”

- E

SHANE DAWSON

Goodreads:

“This book made me cry, laugh, and feel happy. I went into this book expecting to laugh a lot, and while that did happen, I also felt an abundance of other emotions that I wasn't expecting to feel. This was a great book that explores what it's like to be human, and what it's like to go through emotional and physical a struggle.”

- Lauren

GRACE HELBIG

Goodreads:

“While a lot of the book is tongue-in-cheek and written exactly how she speaks, Grace covers real issues like interviewing for a job, surviving school and office life, managing anxiety, and making adult friends. She shares dating advice, home decor, party and travel tips, and even explains how to enjoy alone time. The book is filled with pictures of her adorable face, fun worksheets, and easy recipes. While it didn't really apply to me, I thought it was a cute book and would make a fun gift for a college student in your life.”

- Christina

“As a young, 22 year old facing the challenges of finding myself and standing on my own two feet, I couldn't have asked for a more appropriate guide to navigating the choppy seas of adulthood. Despite Grace's signature sign-off, "I don't know", she proves she really does know. And she is kind enough to share her life happenings with us in the hopes of helping us grow into adulthood with a few less bumps in the road. The internet's older sister has brought her wisdom to the literary world, and I couldn't be more excited!

- Kimberley

JOEY GRACEFFA

Goodreads:

“It's a compelling, real life story, even though it sounds like something an author would make up for a YA fiction book - main character is bullied because he acts feminine, mother has to go to rehab because of alcoholism multiple times, little brother has autism, boy learns to accept the fact that he's gay, has awkward first dates and first kisses and first break-ups. It wasn't a fantastic work of literature, but it was a decently well-written memoir of being young in today's world, and I think a lot of teens will love it and find some great messages.”

- Katie Sorensen

“In his book, Joey does a great job of simply telling a story - which, after all, is what writing a book (even an autobiography) is all about. I have read too many autobiographies in which the authors preach too much to the readers, providing them with life lesson after life lesson rather than focusing more on the actual art of telling the story of their life. I thought Joey's autobiography was so great because while I was reading it, I felt like I was reading any other novel. His dialogue felt so natural (even though much of it was likely made up because who can actually remember exactly what people have said to you in the past) and the anecdotes he shared with readers were unique, interesting, and intimate. Moreover, Joey has a great sense of humor throughout the book and truly succeeds in depicting himself as a flawed human being (rather than the perfect idol many of his fans make him out to be) who is writing this book to help people learn from the mistakes he has made in the past. Bravo, Joey!”

- Rick Pfleeger

TYLER OAKLEY

From the Critics:

“Tyler gives us plenty to read about from the course of his life, from his childhood to today. We learn about his family, his life, his coming to terms with being gay with a religious father, his grindr experiences, his eating disorder, nothing (it seems) is off limits. It’s as if after years of giving us Tyler, he is ready for us to know Mathew as well. These are often funny stories yes, but Oakley doesn’t shy away from his darkness and that is extremely important. His candidness in these stories gives his readers, many of whom will probably experience similar things, a beacon to hold on to as they navigate their own lives and experiences. He gives us these moments willingly and shows how he grew from them and in doing so makes himself even more relatable than he already is.”

-@mynameisgaron

Goodreads: 

“OMG.  This book comes out in like ten days AND IM SO EXITED AND ALL THE FEELS AND JUST OMGDBBEHDJXJHEHESH. You feel me?

Give it to mmmemeemeeeeeeeeeeeseeeeeeeee. NOW!!! I have been counting down the release of this book since it was announced!

ALL THE FEELS ALL THE FEELS ALL THE FEELS ALL THE FEELS ALL THE FEELS.”

- Chloe M

CONNOR FRANTA

Goodreads:

“This memoir was so genuine and honest, so inspiring and raw, I related to so many things Connor talks about and agreed so hard with so many things he says. Such high respect for Connor Franta, I'm not even a fan of non-fiction usually, but I loved this!”

- Elesia

“I wish I had read this back in high school. There was this one distinct moment in high school that lasted a few months (much longer than it should've) where this would've been something I really needed to hear; words that would've benefited me to read.”

- Emily

 “Who is Connor Franta? Connor is a 22-year-old YouTuber, who uploads videos about random topics every week. You may doubt how much you'll possibly learn from a person who has only lived for 22 years. However, this is not about the number of years he has lived, but rather what kind of life he has lived so far.”

- Candy Hartley

JENN MCALLISTER

From the Critics:

“Jenn has an incredible voice for teens, inspiring them to be authentic while encouraging them to not take everything so seriously.”

Scholastic VP and publisher Debra Dorfman in a statement.

Goodreads:

 “One of the things I liked is that she gives you some tips of how she got through stuff. Something else that I liked was that she gave herself reasons to not give up. Some things I didn't like was that she sometimes made you feel awkward when you read something. I didn't dislike the ending because, she asks herself some questions for her future self. The ending wasn't too long. " Are you still staying true to yourself? It took a while to figure out who you are; don't let yourself turn into something you're not. Keep being yourself. Keep creating. Keep inspiring. Keep dreaming."

- Joselyn

“In this book, Jenn talked about how she suffered through anxiety, and I was able to connect with her on that,she also talked about how to deal with it, and I'm pretty sure it's helped me incase I feel really stressed.”

- Aleace Morin 

MIRANDA SINGS 

Goodreads:

“I was always going to buy this book as I am a huge fan of Miranda/Colleen. However I was disappointed. I do understand that this is Miranda's book and not to be taken seriously at all, but I just felt like there wasn't much to it at all. I read it in under an hour because there was hardly anything on each page. I did like the fact that some pages had interactive barcodes to scan to watch videos, but to be honest the rest of it was a let down.

- Rachel Kelly

“As a proud mirfanda, I really liked this book. But: when you read this as a person who doesn't know her (basically you don't watch any of her videos in that case), this might get a little bit confusing. After all, this book was very humorous, constantly filled with real-life LOL moments and is best described as a bind-up of Miranda-videos.”

- Arne Sande